︎SPACE SAL00N                                      



.PROJECTS


LANDING is the first successful expedition for Space Saloon’s mobile educational camp.

In May 2018, we invited a group of international architects, artists, and engineers to work with university students in designing and building exploratory projects and installations that were ground-zero for revealing, harnessing, and amplifying the elemental potentials of site. Projects ranged from large constructed base stations for observing the surrounding landscape, to artist-led installations focusing on aspects of geology, wind, and water. Additional lectures, tutorials, and performative field-recordings dealt with ephemeral aspects of place, such as sound, energy, and atmosphere.




EXTENT





PROJECT INFORMATION
Extent is an installation that explores the spatial and visual limits of its environment. This hyper-programmed structure sits in the subtle landscape of Morongo Valley, California, gently landing among a field of sharp and prickly high-desert cacti. Suspended between two parallel walls, each measuring 60 feet long and 12 feet tall, are a series of platforms enabling activities of rest, viewing, and play.

Extent performs as an instrument that is in constant dialogue with its context, reciprocally imprinting on and projecting to the site. The gridded bays capture, orient, and frame space in and around the surrounding canyon in an attempt to provide an exploratory base for future expeditions.




TEAM LEADER
Kyle May, Architect

WITH
Julia van den Hout, Willis Bigelow, Robert Prochaska, Sean Gaffney, Christina Nguyen, Max Harden

STUDENTS
Asya Nur Celik, Amanda Dellevigne, Priscila Villalpando, Max Maria, Wendy Cox, Luiza De Souza, Pollakrit Naimee, Sasipa Punkasem, Thanapond Namnanthasith, Yuka Sato, Ramita Yibmontasiri, Thanjira Vimonanupong, Ranchana Rungwatanawong, Natdanai Wareerinsiri, Kongphob Amornpatarasin, Chutimon Suetragulwong





OSCILLOSCAPE




PROJECT INFORMATION
The Oscilloscape is both a tool for observing and reacting to the world around us. Part observation deck, part resting space, part entertainment stage, this mobile structure acts as a place for measuring, describing, analyzing, and creating various wave activities. The front of the structure—used throughout the day as a meeting space, stage, and bar—produces messages and sounds to be projected and amplified through the conic volume in the rear.

Oscilloscape is a modern take on the mobile wagons of the Wild West. Its ability to reconfigure its use and location makes it an ideal station for analyzing new environments and reacting to constant changes in the landscape.




TEAM LEADER
Hello Wood (Péter Pozsár, Fruzsi Karig)

WITH
Kylie White

STUDENTS
Jacqueline Huang, Tamara Birghoffer, Chinnapat Asavabenya, Sakaokaew Jindawitchu, Santhila Chanoknamchai, Thatsama Leeumnadwong, Pakjira Itthisang, Panchaya Sonkom, Praewa Keereewan, Chularach Engchanil, Tanaboon Kittisrikangwan




GHOST HOUSE




PROJECT INFORMATION
Ghost House is an experiment in material manipulation. Its form, created by suspending two glue-soaked canvas sheets over a matching pair of cubic structures, is directly dependent on the environment. The project site was chosen by studying wind patterns at various hyper-specific locations within Southern California’s high-desert. Over the course of a few hours, after its initial installation, the canvas froze into position, capturing a three dimensional snapshot of a specific moment in time.


Its outline and punctured apertures create the formal memory of a house. However, once inside, all references fade away as the landscape beyond is quietly framed through the crisp portals. It is an improbable structure; the representation of the past existing in the present--neither here nor there; the ghost of a house.




ARTIST 
I Stiffen Thee (Neal Lucas Hitch, Martin Hitch, Kristina Fisher)

STUDENTS
Thatsama Leeumnadwong, Thanjira Vimonanupong, Ranchana Rungwatanawong, Tanaboon Kittisrikangwan, Chutimon Suetragulwong



HUMANS WON’T EXIST AND NATURE WON’T NOTICE





PROJECT INFORMATION
The title of Kylie White’s piece, Humans Won’t Exist and Nature Won’t Notice, insinuates deep time as a medium. The piece itself, a three-quarter inch-thick piece of steel bolted into a vertical outcropping of granite, sits endlessly engaged in conversation with its context. An inscribed grid is etched on the face of the metallic plate, poised and ready to track movements in the rock, or itself—whichever comes first.


The sculpture requires a contemplation on time at a scale larger than our own. The metal may rust in front of our eyes and the ground around may crumble as we approach, but the vibrations of these fastened tectonic plates remain invisible to us. We are left only with the ability to track the movements of the sun across its polished face, reminding us of humankind’s specific scale in quantified time.




ARTIST
Kylie White

STUDENTS
Pakjira Itthisang, Panchaya Sonkom, Ramita Yibmontasiri, Praewa Keereewan



SHADE SPACE


PROJECT INFORMATION
The sun is a powerful force in the desert and dramatically affects our experience of the landscape. Shade Space sought to investigate the quality of shade and its relationship to site by creating a series of physical traces of shaded volumes throughout the day. The installation, considering how the geometry of the sun can be used to generate form, tracks shadows over the course of one day and creates a physical record of this shaded volume cast by the found metal structure. The resultant space is a site and time specific analogue of the sun’s movement, brought down to a human scale.




ARTIST
Willis Bigelow

STUDENTS
Jacqueline Huang, Tamara Birghoffer, Pollakrit Naimee, Thanapond Namnanthasith


WHAT YOU DO WHEN YOU’RE ALONE



PROJECT INFORMATION
This workshop, What You Do When You’re Alone, asked students to engage with—and break from—one’s comfort zone, working towards the design and construction of small-scale singular installations. Students employed a series of temporary spatial performances using resources found around the site (natural materials, found artifacts, scrap material), experimenting with making and breaking personal and interpersonal boundaries. Students were asked to be resourceful and react to their immediate surroundings through play and improvisation. The results of the workshop led to the foundation of a sculpture garden on site, with each piece developing relationships between the viewer, their body, and the environment.




ARTIST
Rebecca Looringh-van Beeck

STUDENTS
Santhila Chanoknamchai, Sasipa Punkasem, Yuka Sato, Chularach Engchanil